A Recipe for Owned-Earned-Paid-Shared Content Strategy

This post was part of a holiday-themed campaign I developed for Lois Paul and Partners, which culminated in the publication of this free eBook containing 13 PR recipes with best ingredients and practices required to achieve great PR results. See it here >> http://bit.ly/LPPcookbook

Just as “foodies” have made us care more about what we eat, the increasing number of socially-savvy consumers – from bloggers to C-level decision-markets – have made us care more about what we say and do online. While the foodie culture has resulted in more sophisticated dining experiences, companies are implementing more sophisticated business communications programs via an owned-earned-paid-shared approach that focuses on delivering unique experiences through digital content that tells a consistent story,  inspires engagement, drives conversations, and reaches key audiences throughout the communications lifecycle and the customer journey.

dinner-party

The analogy for implementing an owned-earned-paid-shared strategy is not a recipe, but rather a hectic dinner party – Some items will be ready to serve while others are still in the oven. Some people may already be sitting down while others are still walking in and spending time greeting other guests. Or there may be more than one chef in the kitchen. But if your agency can be trusted to lead the orchestration of all the moving parts of your strategy, you are in good hands.

Ingredients:

  1. Channels
  2. Content
  3. Conversation
  4. Conversion

First, get your house in order. Refresh you social channels by scrubbing the “about” section, links and other information. Organize existing content into albums, playlists, etc. to make it accessible and searchable. Work with your design team to give your channels a makeover.

Owned Content

I consider Betty Crocker one of my best friends because she keeps me from starting from scratch. Likewise, you should assess and create an inventory of your existing content and determine what is “evergreen” and can be repurposed and leveraged via social channels around industry trends, future announcements and specific phases of the customer lifecycle. You should also meet with your PR and marketing teams to determine what original content can be created on a quarterly basis or around major news, events or milestones. Plan ahead to ensure the message behind the content truly tells a story.

Earned Content

You wouldn’t just invite anyone to your dinner party. The key to succeeding in an owned-earned-paid-shared ecosystem is to find the balance between producing new content and putting that content in the hands of the right people who will help amplify it to your key customers to drive conversations. Develop a list of top influencers to track regularly and target with your content to secure coverage. You should also explore other ways to earn content – empowering customers to become brand evangelists, turning your executives into contributors, speaking opps at industry events, etc.

Paid Content

There is a misconception that putting things online is free. But the reality is that it takes time and definitely money. More brands are using promoted tweets, Facebook and LinkedIn posts to target audiences who use social media to discuss topics associated with their brand’s products/services. Imagine that you are selling a new men’s razor and you pay to place a billboard on a highway where ONLY bearded men drive their cars. Social advertising works just like that. The challenge today is the number of options have broadened – from YouTube ads to entire sections within publications (WIRED Innovation Insights is sponsored by IBM, among others) – your choice of paid content vehicle, of course, should be determined by the goals of your program.

Shared Content

This is the fun part, but only if you have successfully managed to implement and orchestrate the other moving parts – created original owned content, leveraged that content to secure earned opportunities, and paid to amplify the reach of that content to key audiences. This last part is your guests sitting down and enjoying the dinner party so much that they ask you for the recipe, they stick around for drinks later, they call to invite you to their house, they friend you on Facebook and follow you on Twitter and – all along the way – meaningful relationships develop.

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